Bullet points and punctuation

Just to be clear from the start, I am not a fan of most grammar “rules” (especially as they’re usually anything but). My writing may give that away.

However, I thought I’d share something I learnt recently about the use of bullet points which does make sense. But, feel free to ignore them.

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Why 4v4 Team Deathmatch makes a perfect Overwatch game

I like to dabble in competitive matches – I’ll pluck up the courage occasionally to play one but only after a little warm-up first. I’ll then only play one as, otherwise, I find the stress of them gets to me quite quickly.

However, my warm-up and then one-game method appears to be working and, this season, I’m doing far better than before. And it may be helped by the fact that I’m using 4v4 Team Deathmatch for that warm-up match.

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Gutenberg: how to create a parallax image

Parallax scrolling images are all-the-rage these days and Gutenberg has made it really easy to add this style of image to your posts.

On top of this, there are a number of settings that you can use to enhance the image further, including transparency and cover overlays.

I’ll explain parallax images a little more and give a quick tutorial on how to do it in Gutenberg.

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WordCamp Edinburgh diary: my first talk

Another WordCamp. But this one’s different – I’m not going as a volunteer but as a speaker, to deliver my first ever talk. All the way up in Edinburgh, it’s also going to be the smallest of the WordCamps I’ve attended too. 

How will the talk go and what is a smaller WordCamp like?

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R.I.P. Penny

On Monday, one of our (two) cats, Penny, had to be put down. Here’s what I posted to Facebook at the time…

Sad news. This morning our elder cat, Penny, had to be put to sleep. It looks as if the prolific mouser ate some rat poison, which kicked in overnight.

As with all our cats, she was a rescue. Licking and rolling over for tummy rubs, we could only assume her previous owner had dogs. She particularly liked the underside of her chin being rubbed. With Charley joining the family in recent years, she came to begrudgingly accept him (but only that).

Quiet, no-nonsense and not always elegant, she’ll be very much missed, particularly by me. Although I won’t miss her dragging mice into the house.

She died purring as I stroked her under her chin.

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Why you should be using PHPCS if you’re a WordPress developer

PHPCS, an open source “code sniffing tool”, is essential for any WordPress developer. Indeed, if you’re a WordPress VIP client, it’s a requirement, as code is only allowed into production if it sniffs clean for a specific ruleset.

Let me explain a little more, including how you should be using it.

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5 more WordPress Gutenberg editor tips to help you work more productively

WPLift has posted an excellent list of 20+ tips for Gutenberg. Here’s 5 more.

1. View your word counts

For the serious writer, word counts can be essential. In the classic editor, a simple word count was shown at the bottom of the editor window. Although no longer constantly on display, the Gutenberg solution gives you not just word counts but also information on headings, paragraphs and blocks too.

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WordPress plugins: How to detect and block use of ClassicPress

As a plugin developer, I donate my time and energies to the WordPress community. I make it clear that I don’t support anyone modifying my code or running it on a non-standard variation of WordPress – this includes forks.

Although not the most popular WordPress fork, ClassicPress is getting a lot of publicity and interest at the moment. And for those developers who may wish to detect and, even, block use of this fork, ClassicPress themselves have made this something that is easy to achieve.

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Putting up barriers to selling through rules and complexity

My daughter brought home a letter and order form from school this week, promoting a company that allows you to have your child’s drawing added to various Christmas items – cards, tags, that kind of thing.

Except, in my opinion, it’s a perfect example of how to put up so many barriers and make things so complex that you’re just going to lose sales.

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